Saturday, 9 April 2016

Bingo with Year 11 for Acids and Bases

Last week I played bingo with Year 11, for the first 20 elements of the periodic table. I sort of found bingo sheets online - the only one that included the first 20 elements was in the format of lines rather than the familiar table format, and the kids did query me; "don't you know what bingo is Miss?!"

By changing up some of the clues we were able to revise electron configuration, ion formation, and the periodic table:

Magnesium
Mg
2,8,2
The electron configuration for this element's’ ion is 2,8 and it has LOST 2 electrons
Hydrogen

1
Water molecules have two of these in them.
Lithium

2,1
The electron configuration for this element's’ ion is 2 and it has LOST 1 electrons
Calcium

2,8,8,2
The electron configuration for this element's’ ion is 2,8,8 and it has LOST 2 electrons
Phosphorus
P
2,8,5
The electron configuration for this element's’ ion is 2,8,8 and it has GAINED 3 electrons
Nitrogen
N
2,5
This atom has 7 protons
Argon

2,8,8
Has three full electron shells
Chlorine
Cl
2,8,7
This atom has 3 electrons shells, and gains 1 electron to become a negative ion.
Oxygen

2,6
Water molecules have one of these in them.
Helium

2
The first noble gas in group 18.
Berylium

2,2
Has four electrons
Fluorine

2,7
This atom has 9 protons.
Carbon

2,4
This atom makes up diamonds.
Boron

2,3
This atom has 2 electron shells, but loses 3 electrons to become a 3 plus ion.
Neon
Ne
2,8
Has two full electron shells
Sodium
Na
2,8,1
Has eleven electrons
Aluminium

2,8,3
The element now used to make tin cans.
Silicon

2,8,4
The element often used in breast implants.
Sulfur

2,8,6
This element is found lots in Rotorua, it is often yellow, it stinks like rotten eggs and it’s found around volcanoes and volcanic vents.
Potassium
K
2,8,8,1
This element has 4 electron shells but is not Calcium

They ended up enjoying it anyway, and it was so popular that I've decided to try this tactic again to help students become familiar with names of different ions, as they will be given an un-named Table of Ions in their NCEA Acids and Bases exam at the end of the year.  Unfortunately I couldn't find a good game of Bingo online (again), so this time I painstakingly made 20 bingo cards and to save someone else the trouble in the future I thought I would share them here:


Feel free to make a copy and use it! 

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